THE DRESSMAKER by Rosalie Ham

 

the-dressmaker cover
Without a doubt, this book is one of the most enjoyable reads I’ve had this year. From start to finish I was captivated by the characters, storyline and the prose.

Rosalie Ham is a writer with a cutting sense of wit and she imbues The Dressmaker with keen observations on life in the small Victorian wheat belt town of Dungatar, of what goes on behind closed doors, and the insidious nature of gossip. With caricature characters such as Mad Molly, who lives on the hill, Miss Dimm, the school teacher, Mr Almanac, the town chemist, and the Pratts, who own the only department store in town, you soon appreciate the sharpness of Rosalie Ham’s pen and imagination.

Myrtle Dunnage, now going by the name of Tilly, returns to her hometown of Dungatar after many years absence. She restores her mother, Mad Molly, to health through the brewing of herbs and concoctions, and attempts to slowly integrate herself back into the small community through her couture dressmaking and design skills. But, the people of Dungatar are an unforgiving bunch, and their scorn for Tilly goes much deeper than her heritage of being a bastard child. In their eyes, Tilly Dunnage is a murderess who should be run out of town. However, the gossiping women’s egos soon take over, dominating the small town’s social circuit, as they compete against each other for Tilly’s fashionable creations and vie to be the best dressed and the most beautiful. There are excellent descriptions of frothing, flowing and sumptuous designs that add a fairytale element (like Cinderella dressing for the ball), combined with humorous jabs at the snooty women’s poorer clothing choices or personal attributes that are as sly as an evil stepsister. Pure magic and devilish delight.

The characters in this book are loathsome, despicable and utterly delightful. Many of them behave in completely inappropriate ways – rummaging through Tilly’s mail and keeping items for themselves, for example. Some of the antics they get up to behind closed doors are outrageous, sinful, cruel, gentle and tender. These moments are a driving force in the book. Also, there is a rich theatrical element with delightful character descriptions that make The Dressmaker such a good read.

Rosalie Ham is not afraid to upset her readers, and there are events within the book that made me want to shout ‘No! You can’t do that!’ but she did, and as devastated as I was, I had no choice to keep reading to see where the she would direct the story.

A dark, sinister undertone accompanies the light, fluffy, fashion-driven moments of silk and lace in this novel. There is tragedy, and then there is retribution, dished out in deliciously satisfying ways. The final act of revenge is a scorcher! I was most impressed at the turns this book took, and confess that I can’t wait to see the movie adaptation to see how they have handled this fantastical, dark-humoured novel.

The Dressmaker by Rosalie Ham (Duffy & Snellgrove 2000)

eISBN: 9780987082039

Author website: Rosalie Ham – The Dressmaker

Author FB page: Rosalie Ham Writer and Novelist

 

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3 thoughts on “THE DRESSMAKER by Rosalie Ham

  1. What a great review of the book, not that I’ve read it! I recently saw the movie, and while I loved the acting and the costumes, I couldn’t quite ‘get’ it. I wasn’t sure where to place the film—it was black comedy, but then … It seemed to cross so many genres. Maybe that’s my issue because I like my films to sit neatly in their pigeonhole! Anyway, great review Sonja—you’ve tempted me to buy it and I wasn’t going to!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Louise, I went and saw the movie last night and absolutely loved it! The costumes, the characterisations were all brilliant!! But what I noticed was that the film seemed to jump around a bit, that there were unexplained gaps, which are unavoidable due to the depth of detail in the book that simply couldn’t be conveyed in the limited time frame of a movie genre. The movie is a wonderful adaptation but to gain a sense of those missing bits, and the depth of the sinisterness that runs through the story (and the depth of the revenge at the end – there’s more to Tilly’s plan than just that scorching fire that the movie conveys), reading the book is a must. I hope you enjoy the book as much as I did. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Pingback: Australian Women Writer’s Challenge 2015 – Wrap up | Sonja's Bookshelf

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